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over the next hour or debate focusing on education standards around the world the latest international survey shows the station students for the best by far in every category friends in the uk struggling to keep their heads above water. what makes a good score and prepares students to compete in today's world. we've got peaches analysts and economists who carried out surveys which seemed to give you their opinion an opponent after that. first though international news. thank you city and these are the headlines to see mya has been out from under it shot dead outside his time in pay rates. the shiite militant group was quick to accuse israel which denies any involvement. protesters refused to leave she as independents ladder onto the prime minister warned the opposition to stop asking making a difficult time. and then to make it to print the building faces hefty fines on anyone paying this tax to head to the senate and the next two. says israel will suffer the consequences for measuring a senior. c'mon get this wednesday. kason of lackey said patio weapons and explosives expect place to
and being responsive and looking at workers compensation reform or hiving -- or having a highly educated labor sector. drive an things help economy. people in the past said, well, we really don't have enough fossil fuel supply. but now we know, through technology and innovation, having the good and fair regulations, that we do have energy supply. so my state of oklahoma, since 2011 when i took office because of our business-friendly policies, education, reform we have done, making government smaller and more efficient, we have seen our economy change. the per capita income has grown by 8% for a family of four. >> it is self-defense. you have a guy who will steal every last job from you if they can. rick perry -- he is glad they are up here right now. while we are up here talking, he had his people on the phone to ohio and oklahoma stealing their jobs. >> we fish where the fish are. and generally speaking, i am spending a lot more time in california or illinois and new york than i am in oklahoma. >> we just beat him in football. [laughter] >> you know how to hurt a person, mary. >> but li
the nonprofit in general you're going to have the lowest age workers in the city and childcare over education is on the bottom of the nonprofit sector so it's easily to understand why people in it sector can't afford to live in inform. without objection the waiver will be waived. accepted >> and the motion. >> and i'd like to make a motion we move her name with positive recommendations. >> without objection the motion is passed. >> item 3 is to consider poinlt one member term ending to the public utilities bond oversight committee. >> i believe are you present? yes, please approach and make pa comment if you like >> good afternoon. i'm honor to be considered phenomenon the revenue bond oversight committee for the public comment commission. i have approximately 10 years in financial services including running my own business. more recently i've worked as an air quality consultant with the impact statements and reports. i'm also an certified energy and currently development and manage their implementation >> okay. and what's your interest in this? >> really community service we've rais
forces last month. bernard smith has more from cairo. >> former center of islamic education in egypt has been one of the focal points for people, students protesting the coup that deposed mohamed morsi back in september. there's fighting still ongoing despite the arrests, between students and security forces all day. in fact it seems to have stepped up over the past few days, protests pretty much all the time but yesterday we had a group of women students just outside the university beaten up by local residents and by security forces, we are told. earlier last month we had 21 students facing trial for previous protests at al assad university and we have another 12 students who have been jailed for 17 years for protesting again at that same university. so a considerable crack down by the security forces against the students and at al assad university and they are continuing to protest and they seem to be gathering in intensity. >> thailand will hold its parliamentary plekses o election january 2nd, after yin luck shinawatra has, run the country. wayne hay reports from bangkok. >> the lead
to take a part that have memorial. of course, mandela believed education was the foundation for a new south africa. but 37 years protesting in soweto, apartheid is proving hard to overcome. [ cheering ] >> nelson mandela supporting and encouraging children in school. from the start of his career as an anti-apartheid activist, he placed education is the the center of the struggle. his single priority was develop the nation's education. in 197, the soweto up rising began over being forced to learn afrikaans, the language of the oppressors. noone of the students who rioted now is principal of the school. >> wlater because of they were trying to educate us and we begin to understand why the situation, why the up rising. >> reporter: here the students learn as nelson mandela, to educate black students to the level of their white counter parts, to give them purpose. >> they have struggled to fulfill mandela's vision. schools outside cape town are more typical of the problems that the system is struggling with. activists argue there is now a dangerous gap between the promise of education and
online already. martha: disappointing news about america's education system. according to the latest survey when it comes to major subjects like math, reading and signs, u.s. teenagers fall ray behind their counter parts in asia and europe. gregg palkot is live in london to tell us more about these results. >> reporter: the international report card for schools is out. it comes from the well-regarded oedd. while we don't get an f it feels like a c. our teenagers are 20th in the world in reading skills and a as for math, 28 other countries are ahead of our teenagers. here is what they have to say about our results. >> at the end of the day quality of outcome and quality of education can never exceed the quality of instruction. >> reporter: we have had a statement from the education secretary. he calls it a picture of stagnation. while things have not gotten worse. our rankings have split because others have gotten better'. chinese cities like beijing and hong kong lead the way. in a heating unglobal economy strong numbers. martha: we are spending more money, we have more technology be
the novel by the evening. something to that that was posted on an education over the top end of the catholic media. the store was opened on the computers and smash it. science labs reports said. i never write about it often at least we had this to austin on monday it's been ages i mean by that time the campus of us and some spoons allegedly belonging to an al qaeda and eight. the best of from the university hostel in september he was in it. most of the seventeen soccer world cup in twenty seventeen the chief executives' committee which met in the business at the outside but about half as the vaunted that this gene is dominant and yet had the odd it was because of azerbaijan and south africa. it may be the biggest soccer thought of it it gets posted the president said dr said this was of enormous importance for the time to bond point two billion people in sporting political and geopolitical tabs. this is the site. this is book be a big weekend for i need to thank the chief executives' committee but keeping the cross hamas and bombed in depth the bikes who was presenting on the same woke up fr
in the workshop and educators can get lesson plans to use in the classroom. >> you don't use sugar for any of these things, right? sugar has seen a big decrease in the last five weeks. sugar prices have dropped pretty steadily in the last five weeks. there's nothing surprisingly in the 12 days that uses sugar, right? >> if you remember last year, becky, we had the drought in the summertime which drove up food prices and grain prices. >> right. right. >> which caused the bird costs to go up. this year both energy and food prices are down. >> we were going to play a little music or something so the total price is, did you tell us that already, $27,993.17. up 7.7% this year, joe. >> 7.7. inflation. all right, jim. thank you. >> good to see you. happy holidays. >>> folks, it is cyber monday. that's when people return to work and do some shopping online. we're going to talk about ecommerce prospects when "squawk box" comes right back ♪ ♪ the most wonderful time of the year ♪ capital to make it happen? without the thinking that makes it real? what's a vision without the expertise to execut
the minimum wage, equal pay for women, and in the workplace, earl -- early childhood education and pre-k have been part of his proposal all along. i was excited to hear what he said echoed. when women succeed, america succeeds, and this is our agenda. income inequality, as he pointed eroding thely middle class, which is the backbone of our economy. earlier, a representative from kentucky talked about how it is the right thing to do to improve the health of thousands of his citizens over the next decade. he also talked about it from an economic and fiscal standpoint. 50 million dollars will be injected into kentucky's economy. it will bring $800 million to the state treasury, create 17,000 jobs and support their glad toso we were very hear what he had to say at the press event and afterward. in few areas has a lot been of greater impact than in the lives americans with chronic conditions. if you had insurance that you liked before, whatever it was, it is going to be better now because of no pre-existing conditions being a barrier to your access to insurance. also removing lifetime or even on t
their families. it's not easy for roma children in the czech education system. according to much in every below but it's not just because their parents don't always look after them properly. it all she tells me the state must do more to promote integration. rachel tells me that recently check education authorities ask them to count the roma children. it's the will that mean it. if it down yet they want us to judge which children were roma and which were not on the basis of their physical appearance. why did you react and haven't heard anything since then. education authorities put the scheme on ice because of the criticism it received from many teachers. one year ago police said was to not go up and started the pilot project roma like elena by nova and carl someone for being trained a special police officers in an attempt to combat rising crime the city's ombudsman for minorities. pablo books of the lake. helped initiate the project. he believes there will be less friction at the crime rate among the roma falls. so what do we knew we wanted to use the hatred all of the roma police officers are
like lisa or vera or stan educated, experienced, long tenured workers who can only find jobs that pay far less than the jobs they have lost. i think that that is something we really need to think about in terms of the future consequences of this crisis. it will be a huge crisis if the program is not renewed. there is no question that will affect millions upon millions of people, but long-term unemployment has long-term consequen consequences and builds deficits into our future. we need to take those into account as you all craft policy, we as advocates promote policies. this is not just an immediate problem. it's a long-term crisis for our country. >> i would love to hear from you all. are people saying, hey, lisa, vera, we would hire you, but we know you wouldn't stay here for this $8 an hour, so therefore, we aren't going to hire you? >> representative moore, here is how i want to answer that. you can't prove age discrimination, but i lost my job of 14 years two weeks before i turned 50. two black happy birthday balloons were very appropriate this year. on the online job application
government levels. and finally, prioritizing clean water, proper sanitation, hygiene education to preventing or responding to disease outbreaks. basically what we do together right now is the front-line response. we want to make sure people are safe, people have access to basic services and this continues on through an evolution. women and girls would potentially be at less risk, especially in evacuation centers of comprehensive plan to improve security for revenue growth is developed and implemented with cooperation of national police and other security services. opportunities for women to earn a living, especially those in households are essential for protections for abuse and exploitation. the context for recommendations include the typhoons disrupting sources of income for over 5.6 million men and women. i read that this morning i didn't realize how many people had lost sources of income. i beg you looking at a million, 2 million people. this morning it was 5.6 million women and children for women and men. it was astounding. the filipino department of health are warning several diseases
there are five things we can do to fix education in america >> the united states has education apartheid, that's the facts... >> talk to al jazeera with m. night shayamalan sunday at 7et / 4pt on al jazeera america >> welcome back, you're watching the news hour in al jazeera. a recap. demanding that the president resign. >>> lebanese government has sent in the army to take control of the northern city of tripoli. prime minister says they will remain there for the next six months. and thailand's prime minister has defended her government amid growing opposition on the street. hospital officials say two protestors were shot and wounded during latest confrontation with police. >>> now it's a multibillion industry that's never out of fashion. but it does have a dark side, tannery officials earn little more than $2 a day. as part of our two part investigation into the industry, rob reynolds went to meet some of the workers in a slum in dacca. >> of the dirty jobs bangladesh is t to survive, these tannery workers are day in and day out amid the rotting corpses of animals. mohamed says he's 14 but lo
, that i have read so much -- thathat has educated i have educated others about, that i have gone to jail for, that i have rallied on college campuses for. angeles,anded in los when we created the big welcome event for him, there he was and i was just dumb struck. i was an off him. -- i was in late august him. -- in awe of him. >> d emancipation proclamation took a long time to come to fruition. we moved from the civil war into the 1960s, that was our experience. how similar or different was a black experience in south africa versus the united states? >> apartheid in south africa was the worst kind of approach and -- kind of oppression you could imagine. not only did you have people who to the areas far outside of the main city of south africa, who lived in shanties -- one water fountains serve thousands -- one water fountains serve thousands. if you fell into the black or brown category, you simply could not be educated, you could have a decent job, you work in the mines for pennies, it was horrible and awful. worse than what we experience going through the kind of discrimination here in
in energy, transport. we would like to invest in education in the u.k.. we would like to invest in health. we have projects in all of those areas that are ongoing at the moment. i am hoping even in the next few we will make one or two announcements indicating the scale of the opportunities that we have here in the u.k.. >> nigel, thank you so much for now. as we had to break, the world remembering nelson mandela. south africa's first black president passed away late yesterday and the tributes are pouring in. this to had >> to the people of south africa, we draw strength from the example of renewal and reconciliation and resilience that you made real. africa at peace with itself. an example to the world. that is the legacy to the nation he loved. ♪ >> nigel wilson is still with us. he is the ceo of one of the uk's biggest companies. talk to us about floods. we were looking at dramatic $ç#p10,000 people still have no electricity today. you said we have learned a lot of lessons from the past. and ourselvesent and numerous others have played a key role in how we deal with floods her
the education secretary continues to look at this, and we will see what we can do. >> in my constituency, as in many others, small and medium- sized enterprises are the engine room of the economy, so why are business rates rising by an average of nearly £2,000 in this parliament? >> i can tell the hon. lady what we have done on business rates, which is to extend the freeze on business rates that the last government were going to get rid of. what we are also doing on business rates is to have a £2,000 cut in national insurance for every business in the country. for small businesses up and down our high streets, i cannot think of anything that will make a bigger difference than seeing their national insurance bill go down by £2,000 and being able to employ more people. on the subject of how to help business, how on earth can it be a good idea to say that you want to increase corporation tax as you go into the next parliament? that seems to me absolutely mad a new labour jobs tax. >> by the end of this year, more than 8,000 people in our country will have been diagnosed with pancreatic c
support the work that social enterprises do, that anchor institutions like hospitals and educational institutions and others can do to create jobs, again, specifically focused on individuals and communities that have the largest challenges this attaching to our economy. so we don't have a date for that yet, but we're going to set it. we're working on it. and so we'll send invitations out to all of you again since you've been with us today, so look for that in the next couple of weeks. thank you again for joining us today. have a happy thanksgiving, and shop small business on saturday. [laughter] [applause] [inaudible conversations] >> today the leader of french opposition party talks about france and the rest of the international community. he'll discuss a range of issues including the eurozone crisis and his country's refusal to sign off on the recent iranian nuclear deal. we'll have live remarks beginning at 6:30 p.m. eastern here on c-span2. >> i didn't get the idea for the for dummies series. i had an idea to do a beginning book about computers, about dos b specifically, and i ki
discusses education legislation passed this his state concerning teacher accountability, charter schools and changes to underperforming k-12 schools. governor malloy has called education the civil rights issue of our time, and he'll talk about his agenda at a forum of the american enterprise institute beginning at 1:30 p.m. eastern here on c-span2. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies this 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> host: and best selling author tom standage has a new book out, and it's called "writing on the wall." tom standage, what do cicero and twitter have in common? >> guest: well, the idea of the book is that social media is a very old idea. we think that it's recent and only people alive today have ever done it. but really what i'm arguing is there's a very long and rich tradition of social media that goes back to the era of cicero, so that's the first century b.c., and the point is that you don't need a digital network to do social media. if you have one, it goes faster, but you could actually do it in the old days. cicero
. we used to call each other and share ideas on tax reform, on education reform, on getting things done. we loved the environment in which you could actually achieve results. that's the great thing about being a governor. and i look at so many members of the utah state legislature who are here, and with each one of the i can tell you stories about how we able to get things done and there can do attitude. just remarkable. joe then went on to the senate and became terribly frustrated with the culture that existed on capitol hill, something that evan knows a lot about. i went on to china to become our senior diplomat running the embassy there, and we kind of regrouped a little bit when joe and nancy jacobson who really was the power behind no labels initially came and said would you like to become a part of this movement? and i thought what on earth is new labels? is a third party effort to try to shipwreck the republicans and the democrats? is it a bunch of mushy moderates trying to get together to take over the world? none of the above. come to find out that it is a group that respects t
education. >> when michele, the daughter of a shift worker at a water plant and a secretary wanted to go to college, just like me, this country helped us afford it. until we could pay it back. so what drives me is a grandson, a son, a father, as an american is to make sure that every striving, hard-working optimistic kid in america has the same incredible chance that this country gave me. >> and many will probably remember that the president and the first lady have been very open about it took so many years to pay off those loans, there's 40 years old before finally paying off the loans. let's talk to jim acosta with more on the president's message about affording education, the disparity of economics in this corrupt, et cetera, et cetera. >> sure. hi, guys. a couple of things were going on there. the president's message, let's talk about that for a few moments. he was talking about income disparity, income inequality and he laid out some markers for things he would like to see the congress pass, some things that by the way the congress is not likely to pass because it's so deeply divide
education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. kand i don't have time foris morunreliable companies.b angie's list definitely saves me time and money. for over 18 years we've helped people take care of the things that matter most. join today. to help secure retirements and protect financial futures. to help communities recover and rebuild. for companies going from garage to global. on the ground, in the air, even into space. we repaid every dollar america lent us. and gave america back a profit. we're here to keep our promises. to help you realize a better tomorrow. from the families of aig, happy holidays. >>> welcome back to "the lead." he showed the world the true meaning of resilience and during 27 years as a prisoner in his native south africa, emerging from that torment to become his country's first black president, leading his people out of the ugliness that was apartheid. we are today remembering the remarkable life of nelson m
. if you look on a very macro , our education system is skills so thatr business can get the candidates they need from the u.k.. on a micro scale, business rates is just one of them. >> this is something you are very passionate about on a personal level. you put a proposal forward. what is the one thing you would do to change it? >> we are all about families, moms and kids and dads. we have a lot of women and a lot of part-time people, people with great skill to work coming back work 80 after having their children. it struck me that the two challenges with skills in our people,is those sort of and there are the young training people. you could have a scheme where you can get part-time work is back on the shoulder parts of that part-time work, getting those guys who haven't training to work, shadow and get some experience in a work environment. the employer gets to people covering one job. two people get training and the government gives them employment. a real society issue we have got is those million people. >> i am a person that is working for you. i have got kids, i am running aroun
by their education that wanted to make them as a john wayne, you know? apparently. it was very sensitive in reality. you have to be sensitive anyway. but to look real mature like that. so i wanted to show the first collection i did. for me, it was evident. the male object. i always felt, not consulted because i do not consider myself as a woman, but i felt insulted for the woman to say, you know, there was that expression for the woman. [speaking foreign language] she had a lot to say, a very modern woman. i say, is that completely stupid? maybe she is beautiful. so i say that the men i show will be balanced. i do not say that is the only object, not at all. unless maybe. but i want to show that community and men. and i wanted to show the masculinity in the woman. >> humans and in passing just now farida kelfer, the was the beginning of the showing on the runway, models who were not typical of the models at the time. i am sorry to say that is this still true that we see so little diversity on the runways. it is really shameful. you have always thought their direct there are -- showing that there is
? >> what i mean is that my education, i have been looking at old movies that i love. we speak about the reputation of the parisian, which was supposed to dress very well. i think that, you know, in france, the eccentricity -- for me, eccentricity is very chic and it is what i love. it is so much about the good taste, which paralyzed. it is still a city where everybody meets profession, sure, but it is sad that you did not seek only may be in the young people, but you do not see when people are in the rain, let's say, in society, like having the joy to address. like you have to be like the color of the street of paris. you ought not to be remarkable. it is very demanding of the people. so i said to the people, no, we have to be like everyone else. in london, it was completely different, and it still is. more distance that makes them, for me, more fascinating than the french. >> we want to take questions from the audience, but i did just want to ask you a quick question about your work in movies because that has been so extraordinarily exceptional. i think probably a lot of people --
to multiracial education. back then, she was really scared when nelson mandela was freed from prison. will we be able to move around the way we used to? will we be thrown into jail? we started talking and reassured people that this country will work together and there is never going to be a thing like apartheid in south africa. of a handfulories of south africans who lived through the worst of times, there are thousands, possibly millions that have similar stories to tell. -- a handful ofs of of south africans who lived through the worst of times, there are thousands, possibly millions that have similar stories to tell. to see the new free south africa, you just have to look around. in a short reaction while. we will talk a little bit about president obama, bill gates already playing tribute and the u.s. secretary-general. you have just seen that moving piece by james. want to talkle and want to pay tribute and want to recognize what happened to them on that day was changed millions of lives. >> that is absolutely right. every south african, regardless of their political view, was touched by
for the education but the passion for redeveloping neighborhoods you such as the western edition was god-given. it's been fulfilling over the last thirty years. the second point of my personal history is when we were asked by the members of this community to undertake the development of the filing more site. i was being asked to work on a site that has great importance. during the process of putting that project together i have frequent encounters with ms. rogers prior to her passing and i remember initialing we proposed it was a mixed project including 40 percent of the units affordable to low income residents. this was a program that was favored by ms. rogers and many in the community but in the end the agency wanted them to be condo. we met with ms. rogers to discuss the change (laughter) >> shall i pray now? (laughter) >> she agreed to support the project spitting of her own personal desires to see something of significance to be developed in the western edition by black folk as rooerd townsend refers to us and she supported our efforts to support that project. the connection of those two p
's the popular movements around the world and educate people about it meant so much a a the as i know. in a small little moments you and conspiracy the music that was inspired by inspiring and awesome and other fees be remembered that today as he passed away on thursday evening show nothing very much. look at the internet's and thank you very much for sending us to stick to the prospect that last one is contrived. since i did. i can woohoo rule. all you. use. as you. going to shoot in the zone by it has received the chairman of the agency for combating economic and corruption crimes today in court on the issue to subiaco reported on the department's what progress for the past ten months this year according to the chairman financial police have initiated more than one thousand criminal cases against nine hundred perpetrators of corruption crimes one hundred and twenty of them are officials of the national and regional level. the agency is currently
are much more highly educated and well trained. they are dealing with complex software systems and they are costing more because we invest a lot more in them and it costs more to retain them. there are opportunities in the private sector that are greater. part of the thing driving these military personnel costs to some degree is the technological advancement and the fact that we are expecting -- what we are expecting out of them in terms of training and performance is higher than it was 23 years ago. host: earlier you mentioned the cost of military pay. a "new york times" op-ed last month suggested that military pay should be put on the table. host: do you think it is likely that pay would be a target as the pentagon looks to cut costs? guest: i think that pay as a target is an interesting idea. i don't think anyone is going to flat-out reduce military pay. "the new york times" editorial notes this is a politically and emotionally fraught area of the budget to be debating. i cannot imagine an area where people would be saying you are going to be getting less than this year. wha
with their daughter's college education. >> she is getting around one huh thousand dollars a month. they are staking advantage of a little known rule. as long as one parent, is 62 or older, the couple can claim an additional benefit for every child under the age of 18. if the parent qualifies for 2,000-dollar as month, the child will get 1,000. and the money the child gets does not reduce the amount the parent receives. >> that is something that is increasingly important, as people are having children later in life. >> another little known benefit paid your spouse for taking care of your children. to claim the care giver benefit one parent has to be 62 or older, and the child has to be under the age of 16. your spouse, no matter how old, can get an additional payment that is half the size of yours. you get 1,000-dollar as month, he or she gets 500. the money the care giving response receives does not reduce the amount of your payment. that's 180% of what you and your spouse get combined. if your base is 1,000-dollar as month, the total amount your family received cannot exceed 1,800. you can delay r
world aids day and one man says the traditional forms of educating people about the virus, they aren't effective. this is how he plans to make a world of difference in providing knowledge for youth. >> reporter: tom hays never thought he would be the face of a national campaign for world aids day. like so many other young people he says he didn't know much about the disease. that is until it was too late. two years agos hays found out he was hiv positive. >> i felt i'd been let down by my school system and other places i expect to get special health information from. i was a 25-year-old gay man living in london. i knew something about sexual health so i set out to create something that was approachable, yet educational for younger people. >> and so he started beyond positive, an online magazine geared toward helping young people understand the disease. >> we get near a hundred e- mails a day and most of them are people in their teens asking very very basic questions about safer sex, hiv, and std's, stuff you hope anybody would know. >> world health organization says young people woul
mentioned that came out of the military en masse in the late to mid '40s and went off to be educated and came back into the political scene, the business scene, the community activities in force for the next 40 years they ran this country. six of the presidents of the united states had been in this greatest generation. every corporate leader had been in the war. all of the political people in washington and the states, the governors, almost all of them were of the greatest generation, and for 40 years their culture prevailed, and they worked together irrespective of different political motivations, they were able to pull together to make the country a better place because they had fought to preserve freedom and they believed deeply in it, and to me that really has moved on so others have taken over the running of the country, and we think it's stable but no better than these veterans were able to do it on their own after having brought freedom to the world. >> as someone who literally put his life on the line for our freedom, do you feel that freedom -- that liberty is taken for gran
education needs to be improved. whether you are going to get a lot of social media used as actually reading the attorney general's guidance, that's a separate question. but i think as part of the measure of art, education in schools as well, hopefully that will help to reduce the problems we have seen recently. >> that's fine for countries like england and whales, but of course, internationally, it's a separate problem, so the laws don't apply to anybody who is tweeting about a british case but from abooed, and it's very difficult to regulate that, isn't it? >> yes. >> particularly when there are different laws in different countries. >> yes, exactly. that is a major problem. it has an impact on high profile cases which would attract international interest. but there are those high-profile celebrities, politicians, companies, et cetera, and it's difficult, and you look at the position in the u.s., where, you know, prosecution for publication of -- of these sorts of comments for contempt of court is very, very limited and that is a massive problem, and i think one really interesting example
education for their children. >> so the president did the talk about income inequality and trying to raise that. look. it's going to be different in different places and at some level, can we depend upon the federal government to make that kind of change or is it going to be a case by case community? are we going to create a patchwork of what a minimum wage can be? >> i think it is going to be by community, by the jurisdiction, by city boy city because east city has a different cost of living. here in the district of columbia, it's extremely costly to live in the nation's capitol. wages are somewhere around $35 per hour. so even at $11 and $0.50 per hour, that's less than $25,000 a year. so you would need to have another person join with you just to get to a 50,000 dollar household to be able to go out and try to find affected alan hou affordable housing? >> some say this tends to dampen employment and you have to increase wages to workers, you might higher fewer people. >> that isn't true. the d.c. chamber represent wal-mart. my job is to represent the general welfare of the citizens. >>
. >> start with one issue education... gun control... the gap between rich and poor... job creation... climate change... tax policy... the economy... iran... healthcare... ad guests on all sides of the debate. >> this is a right we should all have... >> it's just the way it is... >> there's something seriously wrong... >> there's been acrimony... >> the conservative ideal... >> it's an urgent need... and a host willing to ask the tough questions >> how do you explain it to yourself? and you'll get... the inside story ray suarez hosts inside story weekdays at 5 eastern only on al jazeera america >>> welcome back. the city of detroit is the now officially bankrupt. the questions on the mind of many city workers is what will happen to our pensions. it's not clear just yet. it's on the lips of many others who live in struggling municipalities around the country. already lessons to be learned from cities and towns and countries who have received pensions. it could offer clues. for example, rhode island, a community close to emerging from bankruptcy now but cut 25% of worker pensions. 20%
-old university student said had mandela had not made those choices he would not be getting the education he is getting. so many people calling and commenting on how if mandela had not been the man that he was, this country could have very easily ended up like syria or iraq. another policeman we were speaking to this morning saying with nelson mandela's passing he felt he had lost a part of his soul and a part of his body and that he truly hopes moving forward the country and its leaders will remember what it was that this incredible man stood for. john? >> it is so remarkable. arwa damon, thank you. she brings up such a good point. words like legend don't begin to cut when twhen you deal with nelson mandela. when you're in south africa he is more than a leader and more than a legend. he's in the fabric of that nation and some one's sole they carry a piece of him around. >> a very interesting point given what we know is going on in the middle east now the connection she made the country could have ended you up differently if it wasn't for his sacrifices. >> no way inevitable there would not
the questions. sallie mae also is the biggest u.s. student lender. loans to student of on education from the 2012 program for international student assessment, an exam given to 15-year-old worldwide shows the 90 students lagging in math and just average in reading. american students fail to place in the top 20 in any category. education secretary arne duncan calls the result "picture of educational stagnation coastal but added we must invest in early education, raise academic standards, and do more to notchit and obtain top- educators. top scoring teams are in singapore, south korea, japan, and hong kong. an update on the new york city ormuter train derailment reporting investigators believe the operator of the train involved in the jarrell meant on sunday fell asleep prior to the incident. william rockefeller all but admitted he dozed off. sources say he was, in their words, jolted from a sleep and hit the break. but he did not have enough time to stop the train as they headed into a curve rated for only 30 miles an hour at a speed of greater than 82 miles per hour. four people were kil
to give them a better shot. martha: increase the inmum wage and increase childhood education. >> he spoke as if he hadn't been president. he spoke as if he's on the outside of his own presidency. he has been president for five years. what we have seen in the speech and what we'll continue to see is more class warfare because this is who he is. he is a leftist and essentially a socialist. so he believes in waging the class warfare. when he talks about -- when he spoke about the american dream he has a warped leftist view of that dream. he believes the state should use its to force greater income he:quality. when government do that it's essentially called communism. the american dream is built on limited government and economic freedom. policies can be put in place, growth policies, tax cuts, corporate taxes being cut to get that growth going so everybody has an equal shot at prosperity. martha: let's take a look at some of these numbers. just verbally -- 1 per when asked what's the most important issue to you? 1% of the 18-29-year-olds thought that was important. jobs, unemployment rate, 7
of education is year and a journey would want to write to you on that specific case. but actually one of the things this government has done is remove the dead hand of bureaucracy and centralization to make sure that the parents of the free education can teach the way they judge best and the parents have a greater role whether want to and the running of our schools. >> mr. charles kennedy. >> thank you with reference back to the question from the honorable gentleman, perhaps the honorable friend on this issue, would the deputy prime minister agree that for the coalition stand on europe, actions actually speak louder than words? and would he agree that the chances decision sometime back to assist the irish economy, the for secretaries and responsible conduct of the intra-european government to review and the deed the prime minister's own watch this week in china, that get this reference he wants to recommend we stay in? this is a great boost of confidence for people like him and need. [shouting] >> mr. speaker, it is -- it is always a joy to hear the mischievous wit and wisdom of my ri
's still a lot of problems. there's defacto segregation, economic problems, educational problems that south africa needs to advance on in order to realize the society that nelson mandela had in mind for south africa. being in south africa, the folks there, from all different colors, all different backgrounds, all different socioeconomic levels they are talking about these things and really feel like together they will be able to do so much more. >> abc's lana zak, thank you so much. >> the coverage of nelson mandela's life and death does not end here. see how his story influenced pop culture and moviemakers later in this half hour. >>> another headline, the investigation in to she shooting of an american teacher in libya. ronnie smith gunned down while jogging at a u.s. consulate in benghazi. his murder comes days after al qaeda called for libyan attacks on u.s. interests. smith's wife and son returned to the u.s. for the holidays. he was set to join them next week. >>> a wicked storm slamming the nation this morning is far from over. a treacherous mix of snow and sleet crippling the south
. a fascinating character. to many jews, highly educated, and using. from newport rhode island, and fantastic american was from a very good ones family who went to yale, ph.d. at harvard. the aged 27 he was given charge of the survey of all the lands between sacramento and the west of cheyenne. a hundred miles to the north and south, the 40th parallel survey. to consider years. the books and maps. could cost hundreds of thousand dollars. beautifully, beautifully accomplished. and he had all sorts of amazing adventures while doing the survey, but as a reward for doing so well he was appointed to be the first-ever director of the newly established body count the united states geological survey which, of course, today the country in its entirety. the move to new york, the headquarters of the usgs and he was the first director. the second was john wesley powell. his personal life is what i want to mention briefly. i was astonished when i stumbled across it. help no one will hold this against and, but he was a sexually energetic in man, but he did not like white women. he loved native american wom
>> get your damn education. >> ...surprising >> oh, absolutely! >> ...exclusive one-on-one interviews with the most interesting people of our time. >> you're listening because you want to see what's going to happen. >> i want to know what works what do you know works? >> conversations you won't find anywhere else. >> talk to al jazeera. >> only on al jazeera america. >> oh my! hour, hello again, here is a reminder of the top stories. more than ten times the normal level of yasir arafat's chest bone, but say he was not poisons. last month supported the theory that he was poisoninged. the army has arrested wednesday one people in the northern city of triply. two government has odderred the military to take control of the city after weeks of violence. >> ukraine's government has surveyed after two weeks of only six protests. the city is more than $18 billion in debt, and detroit has been operating of the supervision of an emergency finance measure. he says the news is encouraging but there is much more work ahead. >> while we already very pleased we remain very concerned about the need t
this time pt ppa music. give me some julie thank you for real education something that is of the two pink. and then finish. i don't know then i can use the area. i just get out of my system. i forced written on them and singing and entertainment. two on and on. and yes he may as well here are the navigation or teaching. sen constable park was being honored language you know he's east northeast of their own beat. notice in this country to the state and the cars to market. that he had bit like is the right field to hold a variety of costumes. oh and can then goes to women who would be today. well some of them has the torch and some of them had the opportunity to pursue the dream. well some of them now. four dishes and i can use it. my goal. her bow to the young shaman are the senior and he said. it just to continue the hard work and be brave and i made this face right before graham said. it just to show up on the war. the our father who is to have it. the deep other food authority behind him said. shea. you new wing will do little little little little headline news on and on australian aut
. >> you're listening because you want to see whats going to happen. >> get your damn education. >> talk to al jazeera. only on al jazeera america. >> oh my! >> welcome back. here at the morseem, the work of journalists is chronicled and honored in a number you have visits including one which is a tribute to journalists who have fallen while pursuing their stories. one whose short life has inspired creative work, dan eldon who was raised in kenya. he was all of that, brave and bold and lost in a gruesome assault 20 years ago. then he was just 22. and then, eldon was a photo journalist documenting somalia as things spun out of control. on july 12th, 1993, filing a violent assault, protesters in the streets turned on dan and three colleagues working there. they were beaten and stoned to death. in the two deck it's a since that day, dan's mother, cathy, and his sister, set out to preserve the legacy of his brief but quite extraordinary life. it has inspired a number of other documentarians as adam may found when he sat down to speak with dan's mother. >> tell me about dan's work. what was i
now. >>> when it comes to our educating our students, the united states is falling behind again. the woman who turned around the dc school system knows how to fix it. michelle ree is up next. >>> martin bashir resigns after making disgusting comments about sarah palin. she's here to respond for the first time on tv. you'll see it only on "fox & friends" in about a half hour >>> the answer to the aflac trivia question, frankie muniz. the winner is jill from georgia. she'll get a copy of "george washington's secret six" which i will sign and we will send. >>> when it comes to educating our students, the united states is falling behind again. >> just take a look at the latest test results. we have american students, they didn't make the top five for reading, in fact, they fell to 17th overall. >> when it comes to science, we came in 21st. >> the worst of all, math, where american students ranked 26. >> right. so why do our students keep ahe? michelle ree is the founder of students first and former chancellor of dc's public schools. good morning to you. >> good morning. >> certainly
india. i got to see a show that demand is rising from below and business services for the education to health care to measure due to rising income levels and the rapid expansion of the asian legal costs. according to the itv station development outlook twenty twelve update released today developing the service sector with people provide services rather than to school which will be the central theme of cases structural change in the coming years. part of the things in the world. also on the web and made the networks the north the news on jillian. us secretary of state john kerry has landed interlude the salvage whatever is left of the israeli palestinian peace talks. sixteen palestinians and four israelis have been killed since the negotiations for starting back in july palestinian officials claim the two sides remain polarized on the main issues of borders security the status of jerusalem and refugees. israel accuses the palestinians that are hindering the progress of negotiations by failing to recognize
of your education is where it can take you. (now arriving city hospital.) which is why we're proud to help connect our students with leading employers across the nation. (next stop financial center.) let's get to work. i get out a lot... except when it's too cold. like the last three weekends. asthma doesn't affect my job... you missed the meeting again last week! it doesn't affect my family. your coughing woke me up again. i wish you'd take me to the park. i don't use my rescue inhaler a lot... depends on what you mean by a lot. coping with asthma isn't controlling it. test your level of control at, then talk to your doctor. there may be more you could do for your asthma. ... through yonder window breaks ... it is the east ... and juliet is the sun ♪ >>> i want to be in the position of calling you to ask whether i would be welcome. the appeal therefore is, don't call me. [ laughter ] i'll call you. [ laughter ] >> nelson mandela showing his humorous side almost ten years ago when he bowed out of public life. >> the public never got enough of him. and this morning, crowds gath
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